Crazy Busy

The English word ‘busy’ is related to the Dutch word ‘bezig’.  In Dutch, it is commonly used to say: I’m currently working on…referring to “what is occupying your time” rather than “I have a great deal to do”.  In English, we use “busy” for both meanings but in Dutch another word is utilized to mean “I have a great deal to do.”

Druk = busy (adjective); pressure (noun)

But in Dutch, ‘druk’ also means “pressure”.  I find this distinction interesting when I think of the origin of the word “pressure” related to “press”.  And this one word has so much to do with emotional health:

expression

depression

suppression

repression

oppression

compression

On his website writer Tyler Ward shares his views on the utilization of the word “busy” in the English language and shares his efforts to challenge what we currently think about it.  His first post on it “Busy isn’t respectable anymore” was so popular that he followed it yesterday with another post.

“Busy isn’t respectable anymore”

“Becoming less busy isn’t about slowing down”

What do you think?

xxTR

PS. The title of this post “Crazy Busy” refers to a common expression utilized by our FOO and friends.  The answer to the question “how are you?” is often “crazy busy” and when a narcissist in my life says this I have thought – well, you got the first part right, you are crazy. 😉

Further reading:

Myth 4: Much Ado About Nothing

Myth: Much Ado About Nothing

I came across this article, ‘Why Your Brain Needs More Downtime’, from Scientific American Mind.  It reviews research in the USA as well as in Europe and Australia with regards to naps, meditation, mindfulness, etc. and the benefits from all this ‘doing nothing’.  Warning: it is a bit long.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=mental-downtime